Enya: red velvet jacket

 

America Afterhours

Steve Doocey

America's Talking Network (USA) 11 January 1996

Excerpt of 'Anywhere Is' video played:

The shells upon the warm sands
have taken from their own lands
the echo of their story
but all I hear are low sounds
as pillow words are weaving
and mellow waves are leaving
but should I be believing
that I am only dreaming...

Mike Jerrick: waving his right hand as if conducting Everybody now!... some chuckles are heard offstage Ya know, while I was stuck in Los Angeles pronouncing it "Law SANG-guh-leez", California during the blizzard, and couldn't get back here to the east coast (even though I didn't try very hard), I had my friend Steve Doocey, host of Parent's Helper, here on the America's Talking Network, interview one of my favorite musical talents... (What's their name again?)... Enya!

Cut to Steve Doocey

Steve Doocey: In this time when most everyone seems to believe in angels, it's nice to finally get some hard PROOF! That is, if you consider music a worthy enough vehicle for such spiritual revelations. After four years, Enya, the Irish singer/songwriter has finally released a new album. And here to talk about her new CD...

Cut to the front cover of The Memory of Trees

... The Memory of Trees, is recording artist Enya.

Cut to Enya, dressed in the same scarlet floral design dress and black beaded earrings she wore in the Good Morning America interview

Enya, thanks very much for joining us today.

Enya is seated on the left, Steve on the right

Enya: Hello. Pleased to be here.

Steve Doocey: Now, uh, let's start at the very beginning, with your name "Enya"...

Enya: Mm-hmm...

Steve Doocey: Y'know, there you are with Cher, Madonna, and Fabio Enya smiles, people with first names, but seemingly no last names. What's the deal with your name?

Enya: Well, um, when I began working, um, with sound track, I found people found it difficult to pronounce my name. Because, in full, it's Eithne... "Ehn-yuh..."

Steve Doocey: ... Mm-hmm...

Enya: Ní Bhraonáin "... Nee VREE-nine". It's Gaelic. So, um...

Steve Doocey: ... Y'know, "Enya" is probably a good idea, isn't it? Enya laughs

Enya: Yeah, I decided to do the phonetic spelling of Eithne Enya, and just keep it the one name.

Steve Doocey: Mm-hmm. Tell us about Memory of Trees. What's it about?

Enya: It's um... The title The Memory of Trees is actually derived from Irish mythology.

Steve Doocey: Mm-hmm...

Enya: And it was suggested by, um, the lady who writes the lyrics with me, Roma Ryan. We were looking for a title; something that was... strong, and would reflect to what we were working on. And she came to the studio one day and came across "The Memory of Trees". And it um, steers from the Druids...

Steve Doocey: ... Mm-hmm...

Enya: ... when they were in Ireland, and they held the trees as very very sacred. And um, we loved the title.

Steve Doocey: That's great. Now, you mentioned Romer (he pronounces her name "Romer" through-out. Rather annoying!) ... who, uh, writes your lyrics...

Enya: ... Mm-hmm...

Steve Doocey: ... I understand, you know, a lot of us here in the New York City area have had this cabin fever the last couple of days Enya chuckles because we've been stuck inside with all this snow. I understand the you actually lived with the lyricist Romer and the producer just so you could all be in sync when you were working on this project. Is that right?

Enya: Well it was actually on the first album...

Steve Doocey: ... Mm-hmm...

Enya: ... Watermark. And um, it happened that I was living with them and their family. And it was important because um, in that way, we got to know each other really well. And especially somebody else to write lyrics for you, she has to have a really good understanding of what I'd like to sing about...

Steve Doocey: ... Mm-hmm...

Enya: ... and what the melody is about. And she, she has that.

Steve Doocey: Now when you live with uh, with people who you work with, ya know, during the daylight hours Enya chuckles softly, and there they are, just 24 hours a day, mmmm, do they ever really start to bug ya?

Enya: Well it was, it was difficult at times, um, to get away from work. So hence we didn't get away from work chuckles.

Steve Doocey: Never?

Enya: still chuckling Never.

Steve Doocey: Now you are a um... ya know, e-everybody... is familiar with your music, because you've uh, done uh, some wonderful albums and your music's on uh, in movies as well. But ya know what? You're... you're pretty anonymous, because... you know the name "Enya", but ya don't know the face!

Enya: Yes, I agree. It's um, it's something that I feel I have a choice, um, to be able to keep a private lifestyle, because I feel the music is actually bigger than I am.

Steve Doocey: Mm-hmm...

Enya: With some artists, they're actually bigger than their music, but for me, a lot of people know "Enya" the music...

Steve Doocey: ... right...

Enya: ... but they don't know anything about myself. And in that way, I'm able to keep a very private lifestyle. And it's important to the music, I feel, as well.

Steve Doocey: Well you're a very private person...

Enya: ... yeah...

Steve Doocey: ... Um, I-I've gotta wonder, y'know, here we are in a studio with a bunch of guys, standing around watching me talk to ya. Does this kind of publicity stuff bug ya? I mean, is it killin' ya to...

Enya: ... No!...

Steve Doocey: ... to come out...

Enya: ... No!...

Steve Doocey: ... and uh...

Enya:... No!...

Steve Doocey: ... plug the album?...

Enya: ... No, because I enjoy it. I enjoy talking about the music, and you must remember I have spent two years in a studio working on this album. And I'm quite anxious to get away from the studio at this stage, so I enjoy travelling, so it's a great opportunity for me.

Steve Doocey: You are one of the biggest, uh, best selling female artists in the world, but I understand in one unofficial category, you are probably number one. And that is the number one performer of music that is heard in doctor's and dentist's offices. Enya laughs Because, doctors and dentists like to turn on your music because it... the patients who are, you know, sittin' on the end of their... on the edge of their... uh, chairs anyway... it just brings the level down and helps them relax.

Enya: very mildly Mm-hmm.

Steve Doocey: enthusiastically Well that's uh... that's quite a feat!

Enya: still mildly Mm-hmm, yeah. smiles It's something rolls her eyes I don't think about in the studio, because uh, it's something I have to forget about, the success and the listener... especially with each sort of album, and you have to sort of... not want to repeat what you've done, and not want to think about sort of um... what the public opinion is...

Steve Doocey: ... right...

Enya: ... I tend to just try and focus on the music. And afterwards, I'm quite anxious to see what people sort of, how they feel about the music. But to me, it's important that they listen to it.

Steve Doocey: Now during this publicity swing, you actually arrived here in the New York City area Enya chuckles just a little bit before the snow...

Enya: ... Yes...

Steve Doocey: ... started comin' down...

Enya: ... Yes I did...

Steve Doocey: ... So you've been... you've been locked in a hotel room for a couple of days.

Enya: Mm-hmm.

Steve Doocey: What do you make of all of it?

Enya: It... It was incredible... to see New York come to a stand-still. And it great to be here to witness it...

Steve Doocey: ... Mm-hmm...

Enya: ... You know, where people were actually skiing down uh, Fifth Avenue. It was wonderful to see. chuckles

Steve Doocey: It's just.. .uh... it's un... indescribable, because...

Enya: ... Mm-hmm...

Steve Doocey: ... I've never seen anything like it as well. You live in Ireland.

Enya: Mm-hmm, I do...

Steve Doocey: Where, of course, you're a big star. Um, describe a typical day for us. I mean, what do you do? What time do you get up? Uh, do you have breakfast? What do you do?

Enya: Um, in the studio I like to work. Early. And, uh, so I'd be up and about by sort of 8 o'clock. And um, go for a walk. And the studio's actually clears her throat 20 minutes away from me. So then I spend uh, up to sort of lunch time in the studio working. And what I like actually is the morning time. And uh, not to... A lot of musicians like the night time...

Steve Doocey: ... Mm-hmm...

Enya: ... but I tend to just like to work up to about sort of 10 o'clock in the evening, maybe. And, you know, I think its...

Steve Doocey: ... So you spend all day in the studio?

Enya: Mm-hmm. Yeah.

Steve Doocey: Man! That's a lot!

Enya: It is, but if you're the only one performing the music, and writing the music, it's... it's quite demanding. But, it's only just for two years, then I get time to myself...

Steve Doocey: Mm-hmm. And what...

Enya: ... after that...

Steve Doocey: ... do you like to do, what do you like to do when you do have time off? Where do you like to go?

Enya: I... I like to travel, but it's very important for me to catch up with family and friends...

Steve Doocey: ... Mm-hmm...

Enya: ... because they're terribly neglected slight chuckle from all the time I tend to spend in the studio.

Steve Doocey: And they must be awfully proud of you!

Enya: They, they are. They are. Mm-hmm.

Steve Doocey: That's terrific. Well, th' once again, the uh, the new album is called Memory of Trees.

cover of The Memory of Trees shown again

Enya: Mm-hmm...

Steve Doocey: Enya, thank you very much for joining us tonight here on "After Hours".

'Anywhere Is' played again as they close

Enya:Thank you.

Steve Doocey: All right. Don't touch that dial, we will be right back.

'Anywhere Is' keeps playing as they display a list of TOP 5 BESTSELLING ALBUMS (The Memory of Trees wasn't one of them)

...enough for me to follow
I look up to the heavens
but night is clouded over
no spark of constellation
no Vela no Orion...



Note: Transcribed by Jim Waters and posted to the Enya Mailing List on January 11, 1996.