Out Takes

It's very important for me to come home to Donegal, to Gweedore,... when you're travelling a lot, you tend to lose a little bit of what you were about, and I find on coming back to Donegal, on meeting people who saw me growing up here, they're very happy to see me and they're very proud of the achievement of the music, but then they will talk about the weather, and talk about the local gossip... I'm Eithne again, as in Eithne in Gaoth Dobhair, and it never changes, and so it's always important for me to find some time to come back here.

A lot of people are under the impression because I come from an area like this that it's all I've to do is walk on the beach and, you know, there's a melody, but it's not. It would be impossible to just sit back and wait for the inspiration to happen, I've actually got to sit at a piano and to keep playing and recording ideas for days on end and then I listen back and there might be just a few chords or a little melody and then I know "this is gonna work".

Music From The Bridge

Interviewer: Tony Greg

London Weekend Television (UK) 17 May 1992

Opening titles: Tower Bridge in London at night. Host Tony Gregory, strolling along the upper walkway of the bridge in front of a hand held TV camera, introduces the show.

Tony Gregory: Welcome to Music from the Bridge. Tonight we feature an artist whose music has inspired some journalists to describe it as "choral swathes", "aural cathedrals" and "pagan forests of electronic music". Well, I'm not sure if Enya herself would choose words like that - as you'll see she's quite down to earth about her music - but Enya's success wasn't overnight. For years (1) she toured relentlessly with family group Clannad before, ten years ago, leaving the brothers and sisters (2) to pursue a solo career. In that time, she's worked on major film soundtracks (3), had a number one record, and sold millions of albums around the world. And in fact, in tonight's competition, we've got twenty-five copies of Enya's album Shepherd Moons to give away. All you have to do is give us a ring on our competition line - the phone number for that'll be coming up in a short while - and answer one simple question.

Start of 'Orinoco Flow' video.

We start tonight with Enya's number one, 'Orinoco Flow', before meeting her in her Irish homeland of Donegal.

Just over a minute of the 'Orinoco Flow' video; specifically, this bit:


Let me sail, let me sail, let the Orinoco flow;
let me reach, let me beach on the shores of Tripoli;
let me sail, let me sail, let me crash upon your shore;
let me reach, let me beach far beyond the Yellow Sea...

Then dissolve to pictures of the Donegal coast and Enya walking along the shore. She's wearing a black outfit - black jacket over a black mini-dress, or possibly black jumper and skirt, with black stockings or tights, low-heeled black shoes and a multi-coloured scarf, though its colours are quite dark.

Cut to indoors shot, a close-up of Enya sitting in a buff-coloured leather chair, her back to the window, with the beach visible through the window. We return to this scene repeatedly throughout the show. The interviewer in this and all the other scenes is off-screen and we don't hear his questions. We do occasionally hear him grunt an "m-hm" or two, though. Enya is wearing a diaphanous dark-blue-grey shawl, knotted in front, over a dark-coloured singlet-type top; small pearl earrings rather than the more ornate dangler earrings she often wears in videos; rings on the second finger of her right hand and the third finger of her left hand (the wedding finger! But don't start any rumours on my account.) All the speeches beginning Enya are from this interview scene.

Enya: It's very important for me to come home to Donegal, to Gweedore, because of, ah, when you're travelling a lot, you tend to lose a little bit of what you were about, and I find on coming back to Donegal, on meeting people who saw me growing up here, they're very happy to see me and they're very proud of the achievement of the music, but then they will talk about the weather, and talk about the local gossip, and this is just... it's so wonderful because it... I'm Eithne again, as in Eithne in Gaoth Dobhair (4), and it never changes, and so it's always important for me to find some time to come back here.

18 more seconds of 'Orinoco Flow' music over pictures of the Donegal scenery.

Enya: The melodies I composed first were instrumental and when somebody would comment "Oh, this is very Irish", I couldn't see it - but now I can see it, but it took me a while to see the influence of growing up in an area like Gweedore coming through the music.

9 more seconds of 'Orinoco Flow', pictures of Enya walking on the beach.

Enya: A lot of people are under the impression because I come from an area like this that it's all I've to do is walk on the beach and, you know, there's a melody, but it's not. It would be impossible to just sit back and wait for the inspiration to happen, I've actually got to sit at a piano and to keep playing and recording ideas for days on end and then I listen back and there might be just a few chords or a little melody and then I know "this is gonna work".

The first 45 seconds of the 'Evening Falls' video, up to the owl landing on the windowsill:


When the evening falls and the daylight is fading,
from within me calls - could it be I am sleeping?
for a moment I stray, then it holds me completely,
close to home - I cannot say.
Close to home feeling so far away...

Enya: To start an album I go into the studio and I start to compose music, all on my own, and then at a later stage I'll bring Nicky (5) in and I'll play him some tapes, and we decide on what tracks that I'd have to actually develop - they'd only be very short little themes that I'd play to him - so then we'd decide "this'd be nice as an instrumental, this'd be nice as a song," so then I'd go in again and then I finish writing them and then we start to arrange them, and then this is where Roma (6) comes in as well. She starts to listen to the music and she'll get some ideas for a theme, for a title, and basically that's how we form an album.

Exterior: a garden in bright sunlight, rather breezy. Maybe the Ryans' own garden? Mid-shot of Roma Ryan wearing a red coat over a black wrap-over top. Her hair is long and black and moves in the breeze, and she looks, oh, thirty-something. She speaks with a Northern Irish accent. Caption: Roma Ryan - lyricist

Roma Ryan: The melody will dictate a certain degree. It'll dictate the type of theme that you're going to use, and sometimes it's just purely something small that will set an idea off. You know, for example, with Orinoco, it was a case of me coming out to the studio to listen, to the pizzicato...

The pizzicato opening bars of 'Orinoco Flow' are played over the rest of Roma's words.

...and while I was listening to it I was looking out the window and I could see my two children skipping, and that's actually what sparked off the idea for 'Orinoco'. It's to do with imagination, it's a journey of the imagination...

Enya: Roma Ryan, she's from Belfast, Nicky Ryan, he's from Dublin, and myself, I'm from Gweedore, so there's a big sort of difference as far as how we were brought up, and we bring this into the music as well, because I bring in a lot of Gweedore and the Irish singing, and I think Nicky brings in a lot of his... the music he was involved with when he was growing up, because of... then he got so interested in the music he became a sound engineer, but like basically he would have been listening to the Beatles, Beach Boys, and Phil Spector whereas I would have been concentrating on listening to traditional music and later on getting involved in classical music, so it helps in a way that when we get together there are clashes, there has to be, you know, to make it interesting for us.

The start of 'Storms in Africa (Part II)' has been fading up under the latter half of this speech. We now see 50 seconds from the middle of the video:


...black earth and ivory
Far from your sun clouds now close over me
How far to go I cannot say.
How many more will journey this way?

Enya: It starts with music for The Celts, and there was a lot of different types of music to be written for that, and basically after that we wanted to work the same way, three people, but musically we didn't know in which direction to go, and we didn't want to push it either, so when a record company like WEA came to us and said they were interested we had to make sure that we had enough room that we could expand on what we were doing, rather than suiting what was flavour of the month, and we found that we could work together with this record company, but before that we steered away, purposely, from other record companies because we felt that they might influence us in the wrong direction.

Scene: an office. Sitting behind a desk is Rob Dickins. The caption says Rob Dickens: chairman - Warner Music, but sharp-eyed fans will have noticed that the Watermark CD booklet spells his surname Dickins. I'll go with the CD version. He's sitting in a black leather executive chair; on his desk are two piles of papers. He looks thirty-something, with black hair, wearing a light grey suit, white shirt, and a patterned tie featuring a large picture of a rose, reminiscent of the flower close-ups in the 'Orinoco Flow' video. His accent could be described as "classless British English".

Rob Dickins: I heard the soundtrack to the Celts TV programme, which Enya had done, and I thought "what's this magical music?", and it was such an antidote to the, sort of, the day's work, that every night I went home and played the soundtrack from The Celts. And then I met her in Ireland and she was telling me how she was signing to another record company, I went "no, no, no, no, you can't do this, you must sign with us." And I did it really just as a self-indulgence, that I thought this was beautiful music and wanted to be associated with it, there wasn't really a kind of commercial edge to it at all.

Enya: We were very grateful for David Puttnam on taking on an unknown on the basis of someone's first six melodies, which were mine, and basically we worked with him on a film (7) called The Frog Prince and, um, he helped us to get started.

Interior, presumably of David Puttnam's office, workspace, or whatever. Movie posters on the wall, including Chariots of Fire, which was a Puttnam movie, wasn't it? A TV monitor in the background. David Puttnam in a sort-of-dark-greyish suit, white shirt and patterned tie, sitting in a leather armchair rather like a barber's chair. Caption: David Puttnam: film producer.

David Puttnam: Something about the story reminded me of Enya, and Enya's music, and I sent it to them, Roma and Enya, and they liked it a lot, and we worked, I think, six months, well they worked six months on the score of the film, and delivered what I think is an absolutely gorgeous score, beautiful score.

Enya: A lot of film people have approached us to work on films and unfortunately we don't have the time to work on an album and do films but we do see that it is certainly something that we'd like to work on.

42 seconds of the 'Exile' video, including shots of Enya singing, and excerpts from L.A. Story:


Cold as the northern winds
in December mornings,
cold is the cry that rings
from this far distant shore.
Winter has come too late...

Enya:I enjoy Steve Martin; he listens to the music, he's got both albums, and seemingly was quite anxious to be able to use some of the music, and eventually came up with a project that he felt he could use one of the tracks, and asked, and we were very happy...

30 seconds more of 'Exile' video:


I'll wait the signs to come.
I'll find a way.
I will wait the time to come,
I'll find a way home...

The show's host, Tony Gregory, leads us into the commercial break with a reminder of the Shepherd Moons competition.

We return from the adverts to see 22 seconds of the 'Marble Halls' video. It's an outdoor shot, but all we can really see is a big closeup of Enya's face, looking stage left, as she sings:


...that you loved me, you loved me still the same, that you loved me, you loved me still the same...

Enya: There is a sound that happens and you can't cut any corners with the sound, so you've actually got to physically stand there for maybe three hours at a time and sing all this, one after the other, and you actually get hypnotised with singing the same part, and, er, you actually wander yourself, I've got to concentrate a lot, but I'm quite comfortable singing it, I get so used to it that it's quite relaxing.

'Smaointe...' for 15 seconds over pictures of Donegal scenery. Not sure if this is a video or just scenic footage shot for this programme. All together now:


Ag caoineadh ar an uaigneas mór Na deora, go brónach Na gcodladh ins an uaigh...

Enya: There are some tracks in this album and, we're talking about hundreds and hundreds of voices, just for an effect, ah, we layer it, but I might sing the same note with the same sound sixteen times, and then I would do this for maybe six-part harmony, and this is only for one section, maybe a little link in a piece, and then I'd go to the next link, and this would have to be done, and this, this takes a long time.

12 more seconds of 'Smaointe...' over watery scenes. The long coda plays over the next speech, fading out gradually.

Enya: It never ends up the same way as we envisage it, it's just, it's always, um, it's either awful or it's, it's wonderful, and sometimes you hear in a section, in a music, maybe an instrumental part, we decide to maybe record, um, five hundred vocals, and it doesn't work, and you've just got to be very brutal and just press the erase button and they're gone.

The first 42 seconds of the 'Marble Halls' video. A lake, mountains in the background, Enya walking along singing. She wears a white jacket over a black high-neck top; she has a white scarf with a sort of rec

tangular zig-zag pattern in a pale pinky-brown:


I dreamt I dwelt in marble halls with vassals and serfs at my side, and of all who assembled within those walls that I was the hope and the pride...

The song continues faintly under the next bit of interview

Enya: My mother actually sang 'Marble Halls' in her boarding school at a concert, and I wasn't aware of this but I think she was singing it around the house and I must have picked up the melody because when I heard it for the first time I was drawn to it immediately, and it was only recently, when I mentioned to her I was going to record 'Marble Halls' that she said "but I did this song so many years ago", then I thought, well, that's the connection, you know, I would have heard it a long time ago; but it's a piece of music from an opera called The Bohemian Girl, and it's by an Irish composer, Balfe (8).

Another 42 seconds of the 'Marble Halls' video:


...But I also dreamt which charmed me most that you loved me still the same that you loved me, you loved me still the same, that you loved me, you loved me still the same...

Enya: Because I play and I sing, I mean, all the instruments on the album, I know each part individually, so it's difficult for me to assess what the album is like. So it's only after, say, a few weeks later, on hearing a track, that I can listen to it like a listener would hear it for the first time, because it would then be like a whole piece of music rather than all the little sections in it.


63 seconds of the 'How Can I Keep From Singing?' video. Enya in mid-shot superimposed on Donegal scenery - the ruined church which has featured in another Enya TV show (Val Doonican's Homeward Bound) and a Clannad video. Enya is wearing a black sweater and black jacket, with typically Enya-style dangly earrings. Other background shots include Mount Errigal, and ocean waves breaking as they roll towards the shore:

My life goes on in endless song
above Earth's lamentations,
I hear the real, though far-off hymn,
that hails a new creation.

Through all the tumult and the strife
I hear its music ringing,
It sounds an echo in my soul.
How can I keep from singing?

Enya: Well, the hymn is two hundred and fifty years old, and it was introduced to me by Nicky, and working on it in the studio I felt, and the last verse, it was such a pity to sing "How can I keep from singing?" and to finish, so I started to hum a little melody that the piece made me feel, that would suit it, and therefore I started composing little parts of the melody to complement it, and the more I would sing and work on it, the more it became more an Enya track.

More scenes of the Donegal coast, Enya against the ruined church, and framed in an arch. 64 seconds of the 'How Can I Keep From Singing?' video:


But though the tempest loudly roars
I hear the truth, it liveth,
and though the darkness round me close
songs in the night it giveth.

No storm can shake my inmost calm
while to that rock I'm clinging.
Since love is Lord of heaven and earth
how can I keep from singing?

Enya: It would be absolutely wonderful tobe up on stage performing the music because I had a great love for the stage and I still do, but we feel it's got to be right and we're still working on trying to see how we could get the music on the stage - whether it's arranged differently for a stage - we're not sure on this aspect, but it's something that would be wonderful.

17 seconds of 'Watermark' over pictures of Enya walking on the beach

I think my biggest ambition is just to write wonderful melodies, and that they would be very lasting melodies and that they would stay for a long long time... when Enya's gone. grins

The first 1m 38s of the 'Caribbean Blue' video:


...Eurus...
...Afer Ventus...

...So the world goes round and round
with all you ever knew,
They say the sky high above
is Caribbean blue...

...if every man says all he can,
if every man is true,
do I believe the sky above
is Caribbean blue...

...Boreas...
...Zephyrus...

Tower Bridge at night in the background, Tony Gregory in the foreground:

Tony Gregory: Enya is currently in London recording her new single, which is taken from the new Tom Cruise film Far and Away. Both the film and the new single are released at the end of July.

Tony then reminds us once again of the Shepherd Moons competition and trails next week's show (featuring Hammer). The closing credits mention the London crew (who taped Tony Gregory's scenes) and the Monte Carlo crew who recorded the Hammer material shown in the trail, but there is no mention of the personnel or organisation responsible for the Enya footage, which is one reason I suspect it came from WEA.



Note: Transcribed by Peter Warburton and posted to alt.music.enya on May 29, 1992. Peter's notes on the interview:

1. As I recall, Enya was with Clannad for about 18 months, which doesn't seem to justify "...relentlessly for years...".
2. To be pedantic, the rest of Clannad consisted of two brothers, one sister, two uncles. But you all knew that, didn't you?
3. Only one that I know of, viz. The Frog Prince. Two others, Green Card and L.A. Story used existing Enya tracks.
4. Pronounced "Enya in Gweedore", but I assume she's referring to her Irish roots, and Irish was her first language, so I thought it appropriate to use the Irish spelling here.
5. Nicky Ryan, Enya's manager, arranger and producer.
6. Roma Ryan, Nicky's wife, and Enya's lyricist and publicist.
7. Enya pronounces it in the Irish way, viz. "fillum" :-)
8. Michael William Balfe (1808-1870). The opera The Bohemian Girl was written in 1843.