Enya: Sepia toned photo, head turned to left

Out Takes

It's so personal to us, that I think people can sense this. It's not like three people sit in a studio, we decide "this is fine". It takes a long time for us to come to that stage. We work on a piece of music; we put lyrics to it; we put a title to it, but that could be six months before we finally listen.

In Concert

ABC (USA) 8 May 1992

Orinoco Flow video begins

Enya: My first encounter with music was traditional Irish music, and then later on, when I started to study classical music I felt I'd love to be able to combine my love of classical music with Irish traditional music.

I come from a very big family. I have four brothers and four sisters, and there's always been a lot of music in my family. It goes back to my grandparents.

I'm a very private person, but with my music I'm extremely personal, and it's a time where I open completely, especially with all my emotions, and there are happy, sad emotions that I go through especially with my melodies.

It all began with an idea, and one of the ideas was the vocal idea. And at first we worked on soundtracks, so there was no need for lyrics. So I used to dedicate and focus mainly on melody. And then when it came that we were asked for lyrics to write a song I felt I had given everything I wanted towards the melody, and I had no inclination or desire to try and translate my emotions in lyrics.

But at this stage I was living with Nicky and Roma, and Roma got to know me very well, and she'd been working on the project with me, and she felt that she could conjure the feelings that I was feeling through the melody and what I wanted to say in lyrics, and that's how it came about, how she started to write the lyrics.

It's so personal to us, that I think people can sense this. It's not like three people sit in a studio, we decide "this is fine". It takes a long time for us to come to that stage. We work on a piece of music; we put lyrics to it; we put a title to it, but that could be six months before we finally listen.

Caribbean Blue video begins

I will sing a vocal part maybe sixteen [60?] times exactly the same and then I will sing sixteen part of a harmony to this, and then I built up maybe to two hundred vocal parts alone, and what has happened is this sound comes forth, and it's a sound that we have developed, and it's very much linked with my melodies as well. It complements my melodies.

I like to sing by using my voice as an instrument, and especially with my classical training. In some cases for a song I might use my voice as a string section to sing the staccato, the arpeggiated sounds, but this is done purely with a voice sound, and it's something that myself and the producer Nicky Ryan have worked for a long time to push the voice to see what we can achieve with it, and by no means we don't feel we have finished with experimenting with the voice.

When I mention about Irish traditional music and I mention about classical, well there is another influence which comes from Church music, and having been brought up a Catholic I would have sung a lot of hymns, and I grew to love the structure of a hymn where the melody is very simple, and hence people will know what the next note is and will join in, and it's a wonderful feeling and I like to capture some of this feeling as well. I love melodies.



Note: Transcribed by Boyd Johnson and posted to the Enya Mailing List on May 11, 1992.